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General Motors Confirms $300 Million Investment in Michigan Plant for its Next EV

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【Summary】​General Motors today announced is investing $300 million in its Orion Township, Michigan, assembly plant to produce a new electric vehicle. The announcement is part of GM’s new commitment to invest a total of $1.8 billion in its United States manufacturing operations

FutureCar Staff    Mar 22, 2019 1:55 PM PT
General Motors Confirms $300 Million Investment in Michigan Plant for its Next EV
A GM employee affixes a badge on a Chevy Bolt EV at the Orion, Michigan assembly plant on March 19,2019. (Photo: by Jeffrey Sauger)

General Motors today announced is investing $300 million in its Orion Township, Michigan, assembly plant to produce a new electric vehicle. The announcement is part of GM's new commitment to invest a total of $1.8 billion in its United States manufacturing operations as the automaker moves toward electrification of its model lineup.

GM's next electric vehicle will join the Chevy Bolt EV. The upcoming EV It will be designed and engineered based on the current Bolt EV architecture. Additional product information and release date for the new EV will be revealed closer to production. GM CEO Mary Barra said today the new EV will come out "in a year or two."

"We are excited to bring these jobs and this investment to the U.S.," said GM Chairman and CEO Mary Barra during an announcement at the plant with employees, elected officials and community leaders. "This new Chevrolet electric vehicle is another positive step toward our commitment to an all-electric future. GM will continue to invest in our U.S. operations where we see opportunities for growth."

The new electric vehicle was originally slated for production outside of the U.S., most likely in Mexico. However, GM said its decision to produce it in Michigan was based on many factors.

Moving production to a U.S. manufacturing plant also supports the rules of the proposed United States, Mexico and Canada Agreement.

However, since the new EV will be built off of the existing Bolt architecture, it makes sense for GM to produce its next EV at the Orion plant.

GM also said its trying to accommodate displaced workers by offering them positions at other GM production facilities. In addition to the 400 new jobs being created at the Orion plant, GM has job opportunities at several other U.S. manufacturing plants for most of the hourly employees in the U.S. impacted by the recent announcement of unallocated plants.

In Nov 2018, the automaker announced layoffs of 14,000 salaried and hourly workers in the U.S. as it shifts its focus away from passenger cars in favor of producing SUVs and pickups, as well as electric and self-driving vehicles. The move was the automaker's biggest restructuring since its bankruptcy in 2009.

GM was targeted by President Trump for announcing the layoffs. Trump threatened to end GM's federal tax credit for electric vehicles in retaliation for the company's planned layoffs.

Trump tweeted on Nov 29, 2018 that he is "very disappointed" with the company's plans to close up to five manufacturing plants and lay off about 15 percent of its workforce.

"We are now looking at cutting all GM subsidies, including … for electric cars," he wrote.

For the 2,800 impacted U.S. hourly employees at GM's unallocated plants, the automaker has confirmed it has 2,700 openings across its U.S. manufacturing plants. So far, 1,100 employees have been placed at other GM plants, with several hundred more in the process of being placed in new jobs.

Other GM manufacturing plants adding jobs include Flint, Michigan; Spring Hill, Tennessee; Bowling Green, Kentucky; Arlington, Texas; and Toledo, Ohio.

The Orion Assembly currently builds the Chevrolet Bolt EV, Chevrolet Sonic and the Cruise AV test vehicles. The plant currently employs about 880 hourly and 130 salaried employees.

Including the new investment, GM has invested nearly $1 billion at Orion Assembly since 2009.


resource from: General Motors

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