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Mobileye & ZF to Supply Automaker Toyota With Advanced Safety & Perception Technology for its Future Models

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【Summary】Computer vision company Mobileye and German automotive technology company ZF will supply automaker Toyota Motor Corp with safety technology for its future vehicles. The two companies were chosen by Toyota to develop Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) which will be used in multiple vehicle platforms within several years, including SAE Level 2 and higher autonomous driving systems.

Eric Walz    May 18, 2021 10:00 AM PT
Mobileye & ZF to Supply Automaker Toyota With Advanced Safety & Perception Technology for its Future Models

Computer vision company Mobileye and automotive technology developer ZF will supply automaker Toyota Motor Corp with safety technology for its future vehicles. The two companies were chosen by Toyota to develop Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) which will be used in multiple vehicle platforms within several years.

As part of the collaboration, ZF and Mobileye will work closely to produce advanced camera-based computer vision technology integrated with radar from ZF to support advanced driver assistance platforms in future Toyota vehicles.

Mobileye, which was purchased by Intel Corp for $15.3 billion in 2017 in order for the chipmaker to gain a foothold in the automotive industry, is a developer of camera-based computer vision perception systems. The company's computer vision technology can identify objects captured by a forward-facing vehicle camera, including lane markings, traffic signs, pedestrians, bicyclists and other vehicles.

The $15 billion that Intel paid for Mobileye shows just how much companies expect the technology to be worth in the future. 

"Mobileye is delighted to be working with ZF to develop leading driver assistance and safety technology for Toyota, the world's largest automaker," said Amnon Shashua, senior vice president of Intel and president and CEO of Mobileye.

Toyota will use Mobileye's EyeQ4 system-on-a-chip (SoC), which is one of the world's most advanced computer vision processors. Mobileye's EyeQ family of chips can perform complex and computationally intense computer vision processing algorithms using minimal power. 

Mobileye's EyeQ system on chip (SoC) can support an entire suite of ADAS features based on a single camera sensor. The EyeQ4 SoC can also process data from multiple vehicle sensors required for semi-autonomous driving.   

eyeq4.jpeg

The Mobileye EyeQ4 SoC supports advanced computer vision processing.

The EyeQ4 SoC will be combined with ZF's Gen21 mid-range radar technology to precisely perceive the environment around Toyota vehicles to support automated driving. 

ZF's Gen21 mid-range radar is a high-performance, 77GHz front radar designed to meet 2022+ Euro NCAP 5-Star Safety Ratings. ZF will be responsible for the integration of the camera and radar-based systems in future Toyota models. 

 The Gen21 radar is also scalable to meet Toyota's needs and offers both a wide field of view at low speeds to assist with pedestrian detection and automatic emergency braking (AEB) and a longer detection range at highway speeds for systems like adaptive cruise control (ACC), which matches the flow of traffic and keeps a safe distance from other vehicles.

"ZF looks forward to working closely with Toyota and Mobileye to develop advanced safety systems designed to meet global safety regulations. Our innovative technologies will deliver outstanding performance and robustness for fusion based systems and ADAS functions," said Christophe Marnat, executive vice president, Electronics and ADAS division at ZF.

Automakers Are Turning to Tech Companies Like Mobileye to Supply Advanced Technologies

The collaboration with Toyota, Mobileye and ZF represents the latest example of a global automaker partnering with technology companies on advanced safety systems. 

Automakers around the world are turning to companies like Mobileye, ZF and Nvidia, as well as lidar developers, to supply the hardware to support ADAS or autonomous driving. Nvidia's DRIVE family of processors are designed to run AI-powered algorithms to support autonomous driving systems.

In May 2020, Shashua said that its more beneficial if automakers collaborate with tech companies instead of trying to compete with one another by developing their own proprietary technology for self-driving cars or ADAS. The collaboration by Toyota is the latest example.

Last July, U.S. automaker Ford Motor Co announced it would also partner with Mobileye to develop camera-based collision avoidance systems, including improved forward collision warning, as well as vehicle, pedestrian and cyclist detection for its vehicles equipped with Ford's Co-Pilot360 safety technology, including the F-150 pickup and new Mustang Mach-E electric crossover.

Mobileye is also working with General Motors, powering GM's Super Cruise automated driving system available on the Cadillac CT6. 

In Europe, Mobileye is working with automakers Audi and BMW on computer vision technologies that can support Level 2 and higher automated driving.

In February, Toyota announced a separate partnership with Silicon Valley autonomous driving startup Aurora to develop the autonomous driving capabilities for its future models, beginning with the popular Toyota Sienna minivan.

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